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Now showing items 1 - 5 of 5

  • The new talent management challenges of Industry 4.0

    Whysall, Zara   Owtram, Mike   Brittain, Simon  

    Purpose The transformational changes to business environments brought about by the fourth industrial revolution create a perfect storm for strategic human resource management, prompting a need to explore the implications of this context for talent management theory and practice. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In-depth interviews were conducted with HR directors and senior leaders within engineering-led organisations to explore current challenges experienced across each stage of the talent pipeline: attraction and recruitment, training and development, career development, talent mobility and succession planning. Findings The speed of technological change brought about by Industry 4.0 had created a significant gap between current capability of employees and the rapidly evolving requirements of their roles, prompting a need to consider new and more effective approaches to talent development. Middle managers are increasingly recognised as overlooked critical talent within this context of unprecedented change, given their essential role in change management. In addition, whilst lateral hiring remains a common talent management practice, in the case of Industry 4.0 this equates to fighting a war for talent that does not exist. Originality/value This paper provides an in-depth insight into the impact of the unprecedented change brought about by Industry 4.0 on contemporary talent management practice, considering how theory and practice might need to evolve to enable individuals and organisations to keep up with the rate of technological change.
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  • Sickness presenteeism: measurement and management challenges

    Whysall, Zara   Bowden, James   Hewitt, Michael  

    Since work can be restorative to health, attending work when unwell should not be viewed as an inherently negative phenomenon. However, the functional benefits are likely to depend on the health condition, and the psychosocial quality of the work provided. The current study used a workforce survey to explore differences in the pattern of presenteeism and absenteeism by health condition, the association of psychosocial work factors with presenteeism compared to absenteeism, and their interaction to predict health. Findings indicate that instead of substituting absenteeism for presenteeism, the two tend to coincide, but the balance differs by health condition. Presenteeism is more likely to occur in poorer psychosocial environments, reinforcing the importance of ensuring work is designed and managed in ways that are beneficial rather than detrimental to health. The findings also highlight the methodological importance of differentiating between the act and impact of presenteeism in future research and practice.Practitioner Summary: Effective management of work-related health requires that practitioners manage both sickness absence and presence together, since employees tend to fluctuate between the two when unwell. Interventions should be tailored to the specific health concern, paying particular attention to the psychosocial environment in enabling employees to continue working without exacerbating health.
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  • The new talent management challenges of Industry 4.0

    Whysall, Zara   Owtram, Mike   Brittain, Simon  

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  • Sickness Presenteeism: Measurement and Management Challenges

    Whysall, Zara   Bowden, James   Hewitt, Michael  

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  • Improving junior doctor medicine prescribing and patient safety:An intervention using personalised,structured,video-enhanced feedback and deliberate practice

    Green, William   Shahzad, Muhammad Waseem   Wood, Stephen   Martinez, Maria Martinez   Baines, Andrew   Navid, Ahmad   Jay, Robert   Whysall, Zara   Sandars, John E.   Patel, Rakesh  

    Aims This research investigated the effectiveness of an intervention for improving the prescribing and patient safety behaviour among Foundation Year doctors. The intervention consisted of simulated clinical encounters with subsequent personalised, structured, video-enhanced feedback and deliberate practice, undertaken at the start of four-month sub-specialty rotations. Methods Three prospective, non-randomised control intervention studies were conducted, within two secondary care NHS Trusts in England. The primary outcome measure, error rate per prescriber, was calculated using daily prescribing data. Prescribers were grouped to enable a comparison between experimental and control conditions using regression analysis. A break-even analysis evaluated cost-effectiveness. Results There was no significant difference in error rates of novice prescribers who received the intervention when compared with those of experienced prescribers. Novice prescribers not participating in the intervention had significantly higher error rates (P =3D .026, 95% confidence interval [CI] Wald 0.093 to 1.436; P =3D .026, 95% CI 0.031 to 0.397) and patients seen by them experienced significantly higher prescribing error rates (P =3D .007, 95% CI 0.025 to 0.157). Conversely, patients seen by the novice prescribers who received the intervention experienced a significantly lower rate of significant errors compared to patients seen by the experienced prescribers (P =3D .04, 95% CI -0.068 to -0.001). The break-even analysis demonstrates cost-effectiveness for the intervention. Conclusion Simulated clinical encounters using personalised, structured, video-enhanced feedback and deliberate practice improves the prescribing and patient safety behaviour of Foundation Year doctors. The intervention is cost-effective with potential to reduce avoidable harm.
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