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Now showing items 1 - 16 of 902

  • Food Vending and Acquisition in Texas Border Region

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey   Cassandra M. Johnson   Zulema Valdez  

    A conceptual model for potential and realized food access was used to examine the factors that contribute to food vending and consumption of food items in pulgas (flea markets), a popular source of traditional foods and fresh fruits and vegetables among southern Texas border colonia residents. Specially trained promotoras (indigenous community health workers) identified and conducted field research in 5 pulgas. Observational data revealed pulgas to be locations where vendor and consumer agency, shaped by structural opportunities and constraints tied to social group formations such as ethnicity, nativity, class, and gender, enable a rich array of social interactions that frame food acquisition by colonia residents.
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  • Alternative components of the retail food environment. Healthy food availability in South Texas pulgas

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey   Julie St. John  

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  • Antagonistic Synergy: Process and Paradox in the Development of New Agricultural Antimicrobial Regulations

    Wesley R. Dean   H. Morgan Scott  

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  • Pulga (Flea Market) Contributions to the Retail Food Environment of Colonias in the South Texas Border Region

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey   Julie St. John  

    Accounts of the retail food environment have been limited by research that focused on supermarkets, grocery stores, and restaurants as the principal food sources for consumers. Little is known about alternative retail food sources, especially in rural and underserved areas such as the colonias along the South Texas border with Mexico. Many colonias are located near pulgas (flea markets). This is the first study to examine this alternative food source for colonia residents. This study's purpose is to provide preliminary data on food availability in this unstudied element of the retail food environment. Five pulgas were identified for study by local informants. Two separate teams of two promotores (indigenous community health workers) conducted observations, wrote field notes, and surveyed vendors in each pulga. Traditional foods, prepared foods, and fresh fruits and vegetables were available in the observed pulgas. Traditional foods included staples, meal items, and snacks and sweets. Prepared foods were available in small stands run by independent operators, and each pulga had permanent restaurants that served prepared foods. A large variety of fresh fruits and vegetables were also available. An emphasis on supermarkets and grocery stores will provide an incomplete account of the retail food environment. Further studies should attempt to provide a more complete account by identifying alternative retail sources used by local residents. One such alternative retail food source, the pulga, provides a range of traditional food stuffs, prepared food items, and fruits and vegetables that complement conventionally studied aspects of the retail food environment.
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  • Pulga (Flea Market) Contributions to the Retail Food Environment of Colonias in the South Texas Border Region

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey   Julie St. John  

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  • Food insecurity, social capital and perceived personal disparity in a predominantly rural region of Texas: An individual-level analysis

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey  

    Few studies have addressed the association of food insecurity with place of residence and perceptions of collective social functioning such as perceived social capital and perceived personal disparity. This study assessed the association between food insecurity and measures of perceived personal disparity and perceived social capital in a region of Central Texas, USA comprised of one urban and six rural counties. Food insecurity, perceived social capital, perceived personal disparity, and sociodemographic control measures were derived from the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment on an analytic sample of 1803 adult participants (74%response rate). Robust multinomial regression models examined associations between food insecurity and perceived personal disparity, perceived social capital, education, age, residence in a poor or low-income household, minority group membership, and rural residence. A model was estimated for food insecurity (n = 1803, p < 0.0001). Residents with low social capital, higher levels of perceived personal disparity, rural residence, residence in a low-income or poor household, minority group membership, and lower levels of educational attainment were more likely to experience food insecurity. Rural residence (p = 0.021) was significant only for the comparison between those who never, and those who often experienced food insecurity, and findings for the stratified rural and urban samples were roughly equivalent to the combined sample. Individual level measures of collective social functioning are important correlates of food insecurity. In this study, both perceived personal disparity and perceived social capital play an important role, regardless of rural or urban residence.
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  • Food insecurity, social capital and perceived personal disparity in a predominantly rural region of Texas: An individual-level analysis

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey  

    Few studies have addressed the association of food insecurity with place of residence and perceptions of collective social functioning such as perceived social capital and perceived personal disparity. This study assessed the association between food insecurity and measures of perceived personal disparity and perceived social capital in a region of Central Texas, USA comprised of one urban and six rural counties. Food insecurity, perceived social capital, perceived personal disparity, and sociodemographic control measures were derived from the 2006 Brazos Valley Community Health Assessment on an analytic sample of 1803 adult participants (74%response rate). Robust multinomial regression models examined associations between food insecurity and perceived personal disparity, perceived social capital, education, age, residence in a poor or low-income household, minority group membership, and rural residence. A model was estimated for food insecurity (n = 1803, p < 0.0001). Residents with low social capital, higher levels of perceived personal disparity, rural residence, residence in a low-income or poor household, minority group membership, and lower levels of educational attainment were more likely to experience food insecurity. Rural residence (p = 0.021) was significant only for the comparison between those who never, and those who often experienced food insecurity, and findings for the stratified rural and urban samples were roughly equivalent to the combined sample. Individual level measures of collective social functioning are important correlates of food insecurity. In this study, both perceived personal disparity and perceived social capital play an important role, regardless of rural or urban residence.
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  • Rural and Urban Differences in the Associations between Characteristics of the Community Food Environment and Fruit and Vegetable Intake

    Wesley R. Dean   Joseph R. Sharkey  

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  • Dean R. Madden (1960-2017)

    Schollar   John  

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  • Dean R. Jaros

    Bradley C. Canon  

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  • John R. Dean: Extraction techniques in analytical sciences

    Yoshihiro Saito  

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  • Reading C. S. Lewis. A Commentary.\r By Wesley A. Kort.

    Murdoch   Brian  

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  • DEAN R. BAKER (SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Release No. 72898)

    Jill M. Peterson  

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  • John R. Dean: Extraction techniques in analytical sciences

    Yoshihiro Saito  

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  • The Birds of Panama: A Field Guideby George R. Angehr; Robert Dean

    Ghislain Rompré  

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  • Michelle Groves Carlin and John R. Dean: Forensic applications of gas chromatography

    Meyer   Markus R.  

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