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Now showing items 17 - 32 of 61

  • Leisure opportunities and new migrant communities: challenging the contribution of sport

    Spracklen, Karl   Long, Jonathan   Hylton, Kevin  

    This paper offers a critique of the much-vaunted claims of sports ability to integrate new migrants by generating social capital. By examining a growing literature base alongside new empirical evidence, we explore whether the experiences of new migrants actually reflect the hypothetical claims made by some policy-makers and scholars about the role of sport in tackling exclusion, promoting inclusion and constructing interculturalism. We demonstrate that the claims made about the value of sport are not found in the experiences of most of our respondents from new migrant communities living in Leeds, UK. We question whether sport truly is communicative in the Habermasian sense, contributing to identity projects, and so counsel caution in using it as a panacea to promote belonging and cohesion. This was a purpose for which leisure opportunities seemed more suited (at least for participants) in our research.
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  • Leisure opportunities and new migrant communities: challenging the contribution of sport

    Spracklen, Karl   Long, Jonathan   Hylton, Kevin  

    This paper offers a critique of the much-vaunted claims of sports ability to integrate new migrants by generating social capital. By examining a growing literature base alongside new empirical evidence, we explore whether the experiences of new migrants actually reflect the hypothetical claims made by some policy-makers and scholars about the role of sport in tackling exclusion, promoting inclusion and constructing interculturalism. We demonstrate that the claims made about the value of sport are not found in the experiences of most of our respondents from new migrant communities living in Leeds, UK. We question whether sport truly is communicative in the Habermasian sense, contributing to identity projects, and so counsel caution in using it as a panacea to promote belonging and cohesion. This was a purpose for which leisure opportunities seemed more suited (at least for participants) in our research.
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  • Special issue on the unintended policy consequences of the Olympics and Paralympics

    Spracklen, Karl  

    This special issue brings together four research papers exploring the unintended policy consequences of the Olympics, along with two contemporary policy debates. The four research papers have a global reach and provide measured critiques of the unintended policy consequences of a number of IOC policies and strategies. The first paper looks at the problematic 'dissonance' surrounding the implementation of the Cultural Olympiad's policies at a local level, using London 2012's cultural programme in Scotland as a focus of study. The second paper critically analyses the success of the Youth Olympic Games held in Singapore in 2010 under the auspices of the IOC and shows that there is a tension between the different policies and aims of the IOC that remains unresolved. The third paper attempts to assess the impact of Sydney 2000 and other sports events on sports participation in Australia and provide a number of strong critiques of the argument that such events are the causes of increases in participation. The fourth paper examines the impact of Vancouver 2010's legacy on sustainability, using a case study of one initiative to critically discuss the concept of 'social leveraging'. These four research papers are complemented by contemporary policy debates: one on London 2012's impact and the other on the potentially disastrous ecological damage of the pending (2014) Winter Olympics in Sochi.
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  • Editorial

    Spracklen, Karl   Scott, Niall  

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  • Flirting with space: journeys and creativity , by David Crouch

    Spracklen, Karl  

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  • The Palgrave Handbook of Leisure Theory || Marx, Alienation and Dialectics Within Leisure

    Spracklen, Karl   Lashua, Brett   Sharpe, Erin   Swain, Spencer  

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  • The Palgrave Handbook of Leisure Theory || The Politics of Leisure in Totalitarian Societies

    Spracklen, Karl   Lashua, Brett   Sharpe, Erin   Swain, Spencer  

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  • "Plus ca Change,Plus C'est la Meme Chose':Music Promoting,Digital Leisure,Social Media and Community

    Henderson, Stephen   Spracklen, Karl  

    This article draws from interviews with music promoters from the northern England to consider their use of social media to develop online communities. It reveals they have developed online spaces offering digital leisure for the making and enjoying of music, but the forming of these music-loving communities is problematic. Promoters are necessarily distracted by what might be called a corporate community of agents, local councils, and so forth. Promoting itself is complicated by the social community of live music fans with its different music genre-based subcommunities. As a result, complex community structures form around pools, webs, and hubs with whom the promoters communicate in both instrumental and communicative ways. Underpinning this social construct, activity in the community is predominantly transactional and instrumental in an approach that differs little from the equivalent offline world and, as a result, offers little as a transformative space for social justice.
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  • Theorising northernness and northern culture:the north of England,northern Englishness,and sympathetic magic

    Spracklen, Karl  

    Northernness is something that is simultaneously as real as the millstone grit of the Pennines, and as inauthentic as the simulacra Roman texts that gave the hills their name. Drawing on the work of Baudrillard, Anderson and Frazer, this paper offers a strong critique of the common-sense idea of northernness expressed in culture by and about the north. The paper begins by attempting to understand this construct historically and from the inside, anthropologically and sociologically. A discussion of the ways in which northernness is claimed to be constructed and performed through shared myths will allow for a wider analysis of how the north is still constructed hegemonically by outsiders: as an essential place of Othering and wilderness. I argue that previous scholarship about northern culture and northern England has also contributed to this essentialism. It will then be shown how northernness has become a form of Frazerian sympathetic magic, performed and invoked to account for cultural practices and beliefs that have been invoked elsewhere for the purposes of hegemonic power. The paper concludes by arguing that rituals of northernness have served northerners well in the past. Northernness is an invention of northerners, but shaped by the constraints that are placed on their agency by the hegemonic cultural elites of the south of England. But northerners have no choice. They must continue to perform because without the performance of northernness, the north of England, the simulation and the imagined community, will collapse.
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  • Moral panics or the politics of pleasure? Alcohol and policy directions in tourism, leisure and events

    Spracklen, Karl  

    This special issue emerged out of the work of the recently formed Alcohol Study Group of the British Sociological Association. The six papers included present work on alcohol and tourism, leisure and events. The first paper draws on fieldwork in wine-making areas of California to explore the ways in which state policy-makers worked with 'wine capitalists' to increase the amount of wine tourism. The second paper uses a case study of US college football to explore the relationship between the bad behaviour of spectators, alcohol use and policies around the sale of alcohol in the venues. The third paper explores the relationship between the Scottish whisky industry, tourism policies, and health policies. The fourth paper undertakes a discourse analysis of narratives surrounding the use of alcohol by spectators at New Zealand's Wellington Rugby Sevens. The fifth paper shows how policies to promote the night-time economy in the city of Bournemouth (UK) run alongside reactions against drinking from local residents and others. The final paper reviews the status of alcohol use in planning and policy-making around Qatar's hosting of the men's soccer World Cup in 2022.
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  • The Palgrave Handbook of Leisure Theory || You Make Me Feel Mighty Real: Hyperreality and Leisure Theory

    Spracklen, Karl   Lashua, Brett   Sharpe, Erin   Swain, Spencer  

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  • Nazi punks folk off: leisure, nationalism, cultural identity and the consumption of metal and folk music

    Spracklen, Karl  

    Far-right activists have attempted to infiltrate and use popular music scenes to propagate their racialised ideologies. This paper explores attempts by the far right to co-opt two particular music scenes: black metal and English folk. Discourse tracing is used to explore online debates about boundaries, belonging and exclusion in the two scenes, and to compare such online debates with ethnographic work and previous research. It is argued that both scenes have differently resisted the far right through the policing of boundaries and communicative choices, but both scenes are compromised by their relationship to myths of whiteness and the instrumentality of the pop music industry.
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  • The Palgrave Handbook of Leisure Theory || John Locke: Recreation, Morality and Paternalism in Leisure Policy

    Spracklen, Karl   Lashua, Brett   Sharpe, Erin   Swain, Spencer  

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  • NEGOTIATIONS OF BEING AND BECOMING Minority Ethnic Rugby League Players in the Cathar Country of France

    Spracklen, Karl   Spracklen, Cliff  

    This article is based on new empirical, qualitative research with minority ethnic rugby league players in the southwest of France. Drawing on similar research on rugby league in the north and the south of England, the article examines how rugby league, traditionally viewed as a white, working-class male game (Collins, 2006; Denham, 2004; Spracklen, 1995, 2001) has had to re-imagine its symbolic boundaries as they are constituted globally and locally to accommodate the needs of players from minority ethnic backgrounds. In particular, the article examines the sense in which experiences of minority ethnic rugby league players in France compare with those of their counterparts in England (Spracklen, 2001, 2007), how rugby league is used in France to construct identity, and in what sense the norms associated with the imaginary community of rugby league are replicated or challenged by the involvement of minority ethnic rugby league players in France. Questions about what it means to be (provincial, national) French (Kumar, 2006) are posed, questions that relate to the role of sport in the construction of Frenchness, and in particular the role of rugby league (and union).
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  • Opeth not metal: making sense of the symbolic boundary work in the leisure spaces of musicians and fans

    Spracklen, Karl  

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  • Introduction: Robert Snape and Karl Spracklen

    Snape, Robert; Spracklen, Karl  

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