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Now showing items 1 - 16 of 133

  • Book review: Gavin JD Smith, Opening the Black Box: The Work of Watching

    O'Malley, P.  

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  • Book review: Gavin JD Smith, Opening the Black Box: The Work of Watching

    O\"Malley   P.  

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  • Mutational Profiles of Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    A.C. Birkeland   J.D. Smith   A. Rosko   R.C. Hoesli   S.K. Foltin   S.B. Chinn   A. Shuman   G.T. Wolf   C.R. Bradford   M.E. Prince   M.E. Spector   J.C. Brenner  

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  • Genetic variation of the prion protein gene (PRNP) in alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    M.S. Vermette   J.A. Schleining   J.J. Greenlee   J.D. Smith  

    Abstract Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are caused by accumulation of a misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP). The normal cellular isoform of PrP is produced by the prion gene ( PRNP ) and is highly expressed in the central nervous system. Currently, there is an absence of information regarding the genetic sequence of alpaca PRNP and the potential susceptibility of this species to TSE. The objective of this study was to sequence the open reading frame of the alpaca prion gene and analyze this sequence for variation within the alpaca population and for homology to TSE-susceptible species. We sequenced the open reading frame of the prion gene of 40 alpacas of Huacaya or Suri descent. Length polymorphisms were identified within the sampled population. A subset (15%) of animals contained an additional 24 base pairs within the putative octapeptide repeat region. This polymorphism was independent of breed and sex. The majority (52.5%) of animals were heterozygous, possessing both longer and shorter alleles. Comparison with proven TSE-susceptible species (sheep, cattle, deer) revealed the following amino acid sequence variations: I6M, A16V, M17T, G92del, Q95_G96insG, N111S, R167K, N/T177S, I206V, S225Y, Y228S, Q230G, and L237del. Sequence alignment showed high homology compared to camel (> 95%), sheep (> 88%), cattle (> 87%) and deer (> 88%) PRNP sequence. This study demonstrates intraspecies variability within the PRNP open reading frame in alpacas and overall high sequence homology to TSE-susceptible species, providing foundational data for further research on the potential susceptibility of alpacas to TSE. Highlights • Sequence determination of the alpaca prion protein gene ( PRNP ) open reading frame. • PRNP length polymorphisms and heterozygosity exist within the alpaca population. • High (> 87%) PRNP sequence homology when compared to that of TSE-susceptible species.
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  • Retinal Cell Types are Differentially Affected in Sheep with Scrapie

    J.D. Smith   J.J. Greenlee   A.N. Hamir   M.H. West Greenlee  

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  • 1: Luminex Detected Pre-Formed Donor Specific HLA Antibodies Predict Lung Allograft Failure

    J.D. Smith   H. Newell   A.J. Danskine   M. Carby   M.L. Rose  

    In designing a quality report, a health plan needs to account for the report’s effect on the doctor, hospital or other provider. This paper proposes a simple model of how quality reporting affects a health care provider, using the example of a doctor subject to reporting with a “cut point” that designates the doctor as above or below some standard. Choice of cut point affects the doctor’s welfare through the doctor’s preferences about income and by affecting market demand for the doctor’s services. These factors lead doctors to be “report-averse” or “report-loving,” a determination that affects a health plan’s cost to enlist a doctor in a contract with reporting and that guides choice of a cut point to maximize the doctors’ effort to improve her quality.
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  • 1: Luminex Detected Pre-Formed Donor Specific HLA Antibodies Predict Lung Allograft Failure

    J.D. Smith   H. Newell   A.J. Danskine   M. Carby    M.L. Rose  

    In designing a quality report, a health plan needs to account for the report’s effect on the doctor, hospital or other provider. This paper proposes a simple model of how quality reporting affects a health care provider, using the example of a doctor subject to reporting with a “cut point” that designates the doctor as above or below some standard. Choice of cut point affects the doctor’s welfare through the doctor’s preferences about income and by affecting market demand for the doctor’s services. These factors lead doctors to be “report-averse” or “report-loving,” a determination that affects a health plan’s cost to enlist a doctor in a contract with reporting and that guides choice of a cut point to maximize the doctors’ effort to improve her quality.
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  • Filtration of RBC units:effect of storage time and temperature on filter performance

    J.D. Smith   S.F. Leitman  

    BACKGROUND: The influence of time, temperature, and rate of filtration on the efficacy of WBC reduction of RBC units was studied in a controlled, paired-donor format. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten donors underwent whole-blood phlebotomy on two to four occasions each. Units were filtered (RCXL-1, Pall Biomedical) under laboratory conditions and gravity flow as follows: 1) after 0 to 2 hours of storage at 22°C, 2) after 7 to 8 hours at 22°C, 3) after 14 days of storage at 4°C, and 4) under mock bedside conditions after 14 days of storage at 4°C. Prefiltration and postfiltration cell counts and prefiltration WBC CD11a expression were assessed on Days 0 and 14. RESULTS: WBC content before filtration was 2.20 and 2.34 x 109 (p>0.05) for units stored for 2 and 8 hours (Groups 1 and 2) and declined to 52.8 and 7.57 x 104 (p<0.01) after filtration. The efficacy of WBC reduction in units stored for 14 days was similar to that in units stored for 8 hours, but absolute postfiltration WBC counts were significantly lower because of a 0.6 log reduction in the starting WBC count after 14 days of storage (postfiltration WBC content of 1.02 and 2.31 x 104 for units filtered under laboratory vs. bedside conditions [p>0.05]). Filtration under bedside conditions was associated with a greater degree of variation in residual WBC counts than laboratory filtration. WBC reduction by filtration was significantly greater in units stored for at least 8 hours (Groups 2, 3, and 4) than in those stored for less than 2 hours (4.59 log vs. 3.83 log reduction in WBC content, p<0.05). Surface expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 as measured by CD11a was similar in all groups. CONCLUSION: WBC reduction of RBC units by filtration was least effective when performed within 2 hours of collection. Efficacy of WBC reduction increased significantly after the units were stored for 8 hours to 14 days, without significant differences between these storage intervals. Laboratory filtration yielded more consistent results than did mock bedside filtration. Temperature and filtration rate had no effect on the efficacy of WBC reduction by filtration.
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  • Improved densitometric quantification of β-region paraproteins with high-resolution gel electrophoresis

    J.D. Smith   G.I. Raines   M. Black   H.G. Schneider  

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  • Macrophage apo E, cholesterol metabolism, and atherosclerosis

    J.D. Smith   C. Grigaux   E.H. Wong   E. Shmookler   E. Trogan  

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  • Characterization and recycling of spent refractory wastes from metal manufacturers in Missouri

    J.D. Smith   H. Fang   K.D. Peaslee  

    Approximately 7500 t of spent refractories are landfilled annually in Missouri. Research was initiated to reduce the amount landfilled by studying the types and quantities of spent refractories generated, the conditions of the wastes, and technologies for recycling and reusing spent refractories. This paper reviews the characterization results from three major spent refractory waste streams in Missouri and evaluates beneficiation and recycling. The results indicate considerable promise in reusing spent doloma refractories as a soil conditioner and spent alumino silicate refractories as a raw material for production of Portland cement. The amount of spent refractory wastes landfilled in Missouri could be reduced by an estimated 50% if these techniques were adopted. Attempts to recycle spent high alumina refractories as aggregates for castables are also discussed.
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  • 70: De Novo Formed Donor-Specific Antibodies Adversely Affect Patient Survival after Cardiac Transplantation

    J.D. Smith   N.R. Banner   I.M. Hamour   M. Ozawa   A. Goh   P. Terasaki   M.L. Rose  

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  • The Yeasts || Ascobotryozyma J. Kerrigan, M.Th. Smith & J.D. Rogers (2001)

    Kerrigan   Julia  

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  • The Yeasts || Ascobotryozyma J. Kerrigan, M.Th. Smith & J.D. Rogers (2001)

    Kerrigan, Julia  

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  • Crank-angle resolved imaging of biacetyl laser-induced fluorescence in an optical internal combustion engine

    J.D. Smith   V. Sick  

    The use of a frequency-tripled, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser in combination with a CMOS camera lens-coupled to a three-stage image intensifier allowed the visualization of the fuel distribution with crank angle resolution for hundreds of consecutive engine cycles. Biacetyl, doped into iso-octane, was excited at rates of 12 kHz with 100 ns pulses. Pulse energies are high enough to allow single-pulse imaging of the vapor-phase fuel distribution for motored and fired operation in an optical engine. The repetition rate of the setup is adequate to resolve critical steps in the development of the fuel cloud around the spark plug of a direct-injection gasoline engine
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  • Effects of coal quality on utility furnace performance

    J.D. Smith   T.T. Spence   P.J. Smith   A.U. Blackham   L.D. Smoot  

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