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Metabolic engineering ofEscherichia colito produce zeaxanthin

Author:
Li, Xi-Ran   Tian, Gui-Qiao   Shen, Hong-Jie   Liu, Jian-Zhong  


Journal:
Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology


Issue Date:
2015


Abstract(summary):

Zeaxanthin is a high-value carotenoid that is used in nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and animal feed industries. Zeaxanthin is chemically synthesized or purified from microorganisms as a natural product; however, increasing demand requires development of alternative sources such as heterologous biosynthesis by recombinant bacteria. For this purpose, we molecularly engineered Escherichia coli to optimize the synthesis of zeaxanthin from lycopene using fusion protein-mediated substrate channeling as well as by the introduction of tunable intergenic regions. The tunable intergenic regions approach was more efficient compared with protein fusion for coordinating expression of lycopene beta-cyclase gene crtY and beta-carotene 3-hydroxylase gene crtZ. The influence of the substrate channeling effect suggests that the reaction catalyzed by CrtZ is the rate-limiting step in zeaxanthin biosynthesis. Then Pantoea ananatis, Pantoea agglomerans and Haematococcus pluvialis crtZ were compared. Because P. ananatis crtZ is superior to that of P. agglomerans or H. pluvialis for zeaxanthin production, we used it to generate a recombinant strain of E. coli BETA-1 containing pZSPBA-2(P37-crtZ(PAN)) that produced higher amounts of zeaxanthin (11.95 +/- A 0.21 mg/g dry cell weight) than other engineered E. coli strains described in the literature.


Page:
627-636


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