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Experimental Characterization of a Pulsed Plasma Jet

Author:
Reedy, Todd M.   Kale, Nachiket V.   Dutton, J. Craig   Elliott, Gregory S.  


Journal:
AIAA Journal


Issue Date:
2013


Abstract(summary):

The use of plasma actuators for active flow control is a widely investigated topic in fluid mechanics research. The promise of having no mechanical components, no fuel or mass to store, extremely short response times, high activation frequency, phasing capabilities, and closed-loop control makes plasma actuators attractive when considering various applications, such as improved vehicle efficiency and maneuverability. Numerous classes of plasma actuators have been developed and are reviewed in [1-4]. For highspeed flow applications, one specific class of actuator, the pulsed plasma jet, or SparkJet, creates a strong synthetic jet driven by a pulsed plasma discharge and shows potential.The focus of the current Note is to present an experimental characterization of a pulsed plasma jet to determine its potential authority as a supersonic flow-control actuator. Phase-locked schlieren images are useful in providing an understanding of the plasma jet's resulting flow structure. Additionally, the successful implementation of a micro-PIV setup provides the detailed velocity field produced by this actuator. This work will also add to the present state of knowledge by expanding the parameter space of capacitance values and energy addition values that have been studied in the past. The characterization of this actuator's operation is of specific interest in controlling supersonic flows, including (but not limited to) separated base flows, shock wave/boundary-layer interactions, and shear layers.


Page:
2027-2031


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