Creat membership Creat membership
Sign in

Forgot password?

Confirm
  • Forgot password?
    Sign Up
  • Confirm
    Sign In
Creat membership Creat membership
Sign in

Forgot password?

Confirm
  • Forgot password?
    Sign Up
  • Confirm
    Sign In
Collection
For ¥0.57 per day, unlimited downloads CREATE MEMBERSHIP Download

toTop

If you have any feedback, Please follow the official account to submit feedback.

Turn on your phone and scan

home > search >

Author:
N. Ohsaki A1 and Yoshibumi Sato A2  


Journal:
Population Ecology


Issue Date:
1999


Abstract(summary):

This article attempts to explain that parasitoids provide the evolutionary pressure responsible for relationships between habitat use and larval food plant use in herbivorous insects. Three species of butterflies of the genus Pieris, P. rapae, P. melete, and P. napi use different sets of cruciferous plants. They prefer different habitats composed of similar sets of cruciferous plants. In our study, P. rapae used temporary habitats with ephemeral plants, P. melete used permanent habitat with persistent plants, although they also used temporary habitats, and P. napi used only permanent habitat. The choice experiment in the field cages indicated that each of the three butterfly species avoided oviposition on plants usually unused in its own habitat, but accepted the unused plants which grew outside its own habitat. Their habitat use and plant use were not explained by intrinsic plant quality examined in terms of larval performance. Pieris larvae collected from persistent plants or more long lasting habitats were more heavily parasitized by two specialist parasitoids, the braconid wasp Cotesia glomerata and the tachinid fly Epicampocera succincta. The results suggest that Pieris habitat and larval food plant use patterns can be explained by two principles. The evolution of habitat preference may have been driven by various factors including escape from parasitism. Once habitat preference has evolved, selection favors the evolution of larval food plant preferences by discriminating against unsuitable plants, including those which are associated with high parasitism pressures.


Page:
107-119


VIEW PDF

The preview is over

If you wish to continue, please create your membership or download this.

Create Membership

Similar Literature

Submit Feedback

This function is a member function, members do not limit the number of downloads