Creat membership Creat membership
Sign in

Forgot password?

Confirm
  • Forgot password?
    Sign Up
  • Confirm
    Sign In
Creat membership Creat membership
Sign in

Forgot password?

Confirm
  • Forgot password?
    Sign Up
  • Confirm
    Sign In
Collection
For ¥0.57 per day, unlimited downloads CREATE MEMBERSHIP Download

toTop

If you have any feedback, Please follow the official account to submit feedback.

Turn on your phone and scan

home > search >

The recovery of asteroid 2008 TC(3)

Author:
Shaddad, Muawia H.  Jenniskens, Peter  Numan, Diyaa  Kudoda, Ayman M.  Elsir, Saadia  Riyad, Ihab F.  Ali, Awad Elkareem  Alameen, Mohammed  Alameen, Nada M.  Eid, Omer  Osman, Ahmed T.  AbuBaker, Mohamed I.  Yousif, Mohamed  Chesley, Steven R.  Chodas, Paul W.  Albers, Jim  Edwards, Wayne N.  Brown, Peter G.  Kuiper, Jacob  Friedrich, Jon M.  


Journal:
METEORITICS & PLANETARY SCIENCE


Issue Date:
2010


Abstract(summary):

On October 7, 2008, asteroid 2008 TC(3) impacted Earth and fragmented at 37 km altitude above the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan. The area surrounding the asteroid's approach path was searched, resulting in the first recovery of meteorites from an asteroid observed in space. This was also the first recovery of remains from a fragile "cometary" PE = IIIa/b type fireball. In subsequent searches, over 600 mostly small 0.2-379 g meteorites (named "Almahata Sitta") with a total mass 10.7 kg were recovered from a 30 x 7 km area. Meteorites fell along the track at 1.3 kg km-1, nearly independent of mass between 1 and 400 g, with a total fallen mass of 39 +/- 6 kg. The strewn field was shifted nearly 1.8 km south from the calculated approach path. The influence of winds on the distribution of the meteorites, and on the motion of the dust train, is investigated. The majority of meteorites are ureilites with densities around 2.8 g cm-3, some of an anomalous (porous, high in carbon) polymict ureilite variety with densities as low as 1.5 g cm-3. In addition, an estimated 20-30% (in mass) of recovered meteorites were ordinary, enstatite, and carbonaceous chondrites. Their fresh look and matching distribution of fragments in the strewn field imply that they were part of 2008 TC(3). For that reason, they are all referred to as "Almahata Sitta." No ureilite meteorites were found that still held foreign clasts, suggesting that the asteroid's clasts were only loosely bound.


Page:
1557---1589


VIEW PDF

The preview is over

If you wish to continue, please create your membership or download this.

Create Membership

Similar Literature

Submit Feedback

This function is a member function, members do not limit the number of downloads