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Life cycle cost analysis: a case study of Lincoln on the Lake

Author:
Sacks, Alec   Nisbet, Adam   Ross, Jarrod   Harinarain, Nishani   


Journal:
Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology


Issue Date:
2012


Abstract(summary):

Purpose - The sustainable green movement is significantly gaining momentum around the globe and South Africa needs to follow suit. However, such a movement needs to be significantly tested. It is therefore essential to present both foundation and supplementary research in the primary concepts within this topic in order to lay the groundwork for future analysis. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the cost-effectiveness of the heat recovery ventilation (HRV) technology incorporated within Lincoln on the Lake, against a direct-expansion (DX) ducted system of conventional practice utilising the life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to determine if the sustainable option is the better choice. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is a case study, based on a green building in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa using a ten step life cycle cost analysis. Findings - In terms of the LCCA performed at Lincoln on the Lake, this case study has found that sustainable measures were far more cost effective over the 20 year study period than that of the comparable conventional system. The life-cycle cost analysis tool has provided a simple, uniform and predetermined manner for which the life-cycle costs of sustainable designs can be successfully quantified. Originality/value - The value which sustainable building practices can pose, has not been fully realised among clients and professionals within the South African construction industry due to lack of proof that value incentives do exist. This paper, therefore, emphasizes that savings can be made over the long term by going the sustainable route.


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